Saturday, October 2, 2010

Gyaware (13)

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Gyaware is one of five villages we visit regularly in Ghana. It means, "It's too far. Let's divorce." The implication is that the town is too far from the main road and that it's too difficult for the wife to live in her husband's community. Gyaware is located right next to Kakum National Park. Their biggest problem is forest elephants which come stomping out of the forest and tear up their corn crops. Corn to an elephant is like candy to a human.



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Downtown. Gyaware, Ghana, 2007.









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The town crier hits the gong to announce a meeting. Gyaware, Ghana, 2007.








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Downtown Gyaware, Ghana. 2007.









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Chief cocoa farmer shows how he can imitate the cry of the forest elephant. Gyaware, Ghana, 2007.








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Following an elephant trail into the forest. Watch the ground!! Gyaware, Ghana, 2007.








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Houses in Gyaware, Ghana, 2007. Photo by Stan Thompson








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Houses in Gyaware, Ghana, 2007. Photo by Stan Thompson








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Waiting for the rain to stop. Gyaware, Ghana, 2007. Photo by Stan Thompson. Gyaware is nestled up against Kakum National Park, and benefits from its proximity to mammoth trees that actually trap and form clouds and enhance local rainfall.






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People of Gyaware (Too Far to Come Marry You) listen to Peter.









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Peter and Tom in Gyaware, Ghana, 2008










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Reciprocity in Gyaware, Ghana, 2008. We were given two roosters and a lot of plantains. We delivered them to a friend of Peter's in Cape Coast.






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Gyaware, Ghana, 2010.
Interesting texture.






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Gyaware, Ghana, 2010.
Downtown.



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